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New Safety Feature Introduced By TikTok In India

TikTok, the video-sharing app, providing users in India more account management power on its platform, has introduced a new safety feature. This would enable them to sieve self-defined words in English and Hindi from the comments segment. The “Filter Comments” feature would eliminate up to 30 user-defined words automatically from the comments segment. Also, users can modify the logged words as and when they wish, as said by the firm.

The safety feature arrives as a piece of TikTok India’s #BetterMeBetterInternet and #SafeHumSafeInternet drives introduced in collaboration with the Cyber Peace Foundation to acknowledge the Safer Internet Day. The prevailing safety and privacy settings of the app enable users to choose who can send them a message or react & comment to their videos and download material from their accounts.

TikTok, previously, had stated the firm was devoted to maintaining an optimistic and secure in-app environment for its Indian users. Recently, the social media application came under the limelight after economic wing SJM (Swadeshi Jagran Manch) of Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh called for a prohibition on China-based applications.

The appeal to bar Chinese apps surfaced after 40 CRPF soldiers were martyred in a fatal suicide attack in Pulwama district of Jammu and Kashmir. Nevertheless, an immediate study on the TikTok application displayed that Hindu chauvinistic content is extremely famous among its users. Also, a look for #Ayodhya displayed 14.1 Million views, while the RSS tag had almost 64.5 Million views.

Likewise, the TikTok operators have approved to pay $5.7 Million to resolve the US Federal Trade Commission accusations that the firm unlawfully gathered private data from kids. The complaint of FTC claimed that Musical.ly—called TikTok now—breached the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, which needs online services and websites directed to kids obtain parental approval before gathering personal data from kids under the age of 13.